Rococo reproduction painting by unknown artist

This Rococo reproduction painting was purchased by my mother for about $15.00 at a local thrift shop. She asked me to frame it for her, which prompted me to do a little digging into the paintings origins.

Rococo Reproduction Painting

There is no artist name listed on the painting. It is very old and there are obvious signs of wear on the canvas and painted surface. There is a lot of dirt buildup and yellowing of the varnish.  The canvas is very dry and brittle. There is cracking of the painted medium in certain areas and the painting could use a restoration.

Rococo reproduction painting by unknown artist.

Rococo reproduction painting by unknown artist.

Rococo reproduction painting by unknown artist. (Detail)

Rococo reproduction painting by unknown artist. (Detail)

The canvas in not mounted to stretcher bars but is curiously held to the frame by narrow strips of wood and two cross-members cut to fit and hold everything in place. The frame is not outstanding in any way and is probably not original to the painting.

Rococo reproduction painting rear view.

Rococo reproduction painting rear view.

Rococo reproduction painting rear view. (Detail)

Rococo reproduction painting rear view. (Detail)

The Composition

The painting is composed from elements of two famous paintings by Rococo artist Francois Boucher (1703-1770). It was during a general search of painting styles of the 17th through 19th centuries that I stumbled upon a painting by Boucher, The Bird Cage (1763) that partially matched the reproduction painting. Further research into Boucher’s works led me to a second painting, The Shepherd’s Gift (1740), that matched another portion of the reproduction painting. You can image my excitement.

Reference Painting 1:

The Shepherd’s Gift (The Nest) draws from the fountain, large tree and foliage to the left of the fountain.

Francois Boucher (1703-1770): The Shepherd's Gift (The Nest) (1740)

Francois Boucher (1703-1770): The Shepherd’s Gift (The Nest) (1740)

Reference Painting 2:

The Bird Cage draws from the man and women. I think the artist might have referenced black and white images of the original paintings and thus the variation in clothing colors on the reproduction… but that’s just a guess.

Francois Boucher (1703-1770): The Bird Cage (1763)

Francois Boucher (1703-1770): The Bird Cage (1763)

Summary

In conclusion, researching this Rococo reproduction painting was a fun project.